eLetters

121 e-Letters

  • alopecia can also be caused by chemical hair relaxants
    oscar,m jolobe

    Alopecia may also be attributable to the use of hair relaxants such as sodium hydroxide and guanidine hydroxide, respectively(1) or other products containing sodium, potassium, or guanine sulfites or thioglycolates(2) to straighten or "relax" tightly curly(spiral) black hair of the type found among South African blacks(1) or African- Americans(2). These products work by rearranging the cysteine disulfide bonds of the hai...

    Show More
  • Author's Reply
    Peter A Lio

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Roberts questions the point of treating warts and molluscum which are benign and will often spontaneously resolve, and expresses concern about discussing these methods of treatment at all. In terms of the former, I regret that I did not more explicitly state that the so-called "tincture of time" is, by far, the preferred method of treating these lesions. The focus of the review is on those cas...

    Show More
  • Warts and Molluscum: An impractical guide
    Stephen Roberts

    Dear Editor

    The August edition of ADC Education and Practice supplement prominently displays on the front cover an infant receiving treatment for molluscum lesions on the thigh. The associated article on the management of warts and molluscum contagiosum explores available treatment options and the differential diagnosis of these benign skin infections.

    What messages are conveyed in this review of Nort...

    Show More
  • Management points for Toxic Shock Syndrome
    Julia E Clark

    Dear Editor,

    We welcome the Education and Debate article on Toxic Shock Syndrome(1), which helps improve the profile of this potentially devastating disease and enhances diagnostic recognition.

    It is however important to highlight some specific areas in prevention, diagnosis and therapy which are not fully discussed within this review.

    As the authors state, early diagnosis can be difficult but...

    Show More
  • Warts, molluscum and things that go bump on the skin: A practical guide
    Helen M Goodyear

    Dear Editor,

    We read this article with concern. Incorrect and potentially harmful messages may be relayed to paediatricians, especially to those in training and other healthcare professionals.

    Dr Lio asserts that Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) leads to stagnation in medicine and therapeutic nihilism, and expresses his concerns of EBM as a “philosophy in treating actual human beings”. Unfortunately this is rath...

    Show More
  • Drugs for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux: in search for clear evidence-based indications
    Federico Marchetti

    Dear Editor,

    Keady S (1) provides some updated guidelines on the drug treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). However, in order to give clear management guidelines, we believe that the review should have first addressed the definition of GOR (ie, physiological) versus GORD (ie, pathological). In fact, the results of a recent survey on the knowledge, attitudes a...

    Show More
  • How green was my vomit?
    John WL Puntis

    Dear Editor,

    I enjoyed this excellent review on malrotation. The title, however, implies that the key alerting sign for clinicians is that the vomit is green, and the paper fails to address the issue of the lack of consensus regarding the colour of ‘bile’. This topic has been the subject of a recent study involving hospital and community nurses, parents and GPs (1). Participants were sent a questionnaire with colour...

    Show More
  • Management pending confirmation of diagnosis
    Sujatha T Rajan

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Embleton et al, have highlighted the issues, especially of immediate management and communication that arise whilst managing children with unknown or impending clinical diagnosis. There are some clinical markers which are characteristic of well recognised syndromes, some of which may be incompatible with life. As expressed in the article, it is worthwhile informing parents. This particular case how...

    Show More
  • Jumping to conclusions
    Mats Reimer

    Dear Editor,

    The prescence of a risk factor is not evidence of causality. Reading this fictious case presentation my interpretation was that this boy has an autism spectrum disorder probably caused by heredity from the father. My hypothesis would be as impossible to prove as the hypothesis presented by the authors that his problems are caused by drinking during pregnancy and attachment disorder, but at least my theo...

    Show More
  • a role for interferon-gamma in suspected tuberculous pleurisy and in supected tuberculou pericarditi
    oscar,m jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    In order to widen the scope of diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in children(1), due cognisance should be taken of diagnostic modalities for tuberculous pleural and pericardial disease, previously dealt with under the umbrella of the polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and adenosine deaminase assay(2), but now also dealt with through the medium of the assay of the interferon-gamma content of either of...

    Show More

Pages