eLetters

38 e-Letters

published between 2007 and 2010

  • Management pending confirmation of diagnosis
    Sujatha T Rajan

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Embleton et al, have highlighted the issues, especially of immediate management and communication that arise whilst managing children with unknown or impending clinical diagnosis. There are some clinical markers which are characteristic of well recognised syndromes, some of which may be incompatible with life. As expressed in the article, it is worthwhile informing parents. This particular case how...

    Show More
  • Jumping to conclusions
    Mats Reimer

    Dear Editor,

    The prescence of a risk factor is not evidence of causality. Reading this fictious case presentation my interpretation was that this boy has an autism spectrum disorder probably caused by heredity from the father. My hypothesis would be as impossible to prove as the hypothesis presented by the authors that his problems are caused by drinking during pregnancy and attachment disorder, but at least my theo...

    Show More
  • a role for interferon-gamma in suspected tuberculous pleurisy and in supected tuberculou pericarditi
    oscar,m jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    In order to widen the scope of diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in children(1), due cognisance should be taken of diagnostic modalities for tuberculous pleural and pericardial disease, previously dealt with under the umbrella of the polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and adenosine deaminase assay(2), but now also dealt with through the medium of the assay of the interferon-gamma content of either of...

    Show More
  • Gut and brain: the canaries of the body?
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    In a study of patients undergoing moderate and tepid hypothermic hemodiluted cardiopulmonary bypass cerebral oxygen saturation (RsO(2)) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) were continuously monitored with a cerebral oximeter via a surface electrode placed on the patient's forehead and with the mixed venous oximeter integrated in the CPB machine, respectively. There was a poor correlation between...

    Show More
  • Re: CO poisoning
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    In Duke et al' study of twenty consecutive children receiving extracorporeal life support for cardiovascular or respiratory failure the area under the ROC curve was 0.95 for DCO2 (and 0.88 for pHi). pHi and DCO2[difference between PCO2 in tonometer saline solution and arterial blood] predicted survival better than base deficit (area under ROC curve, 0.82), blood lactate level (0.29), arterial pH (0.65)...

    Show More
  • Glibenclamide for acne?
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    Drugs that cause acne include those that can impair oxidative phosphorylation such as antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, and cyclosporin which closes the permeability transition pore on mitochondrial membranes. Impairment of oxidative phosphorylation should be accompanied by a fall in cutaneous tissue pH and energy charge. Drugs that aggravate acne include testosterone, corticosteroids, and an...

    Show More
  • Resus Room Poster
    Christopher Downing

    Dear Editor,

    I have developed a poster that summarises the evidence-based guideline for the management of decreased conscious level developed by Richard Bowker and the Paediatric Accident and Emergency Research Group (PAERG). It was peer-reviewed and presented at the Inaugural Scientific Conference of the College of Emergency Medicine at Stamford Bridge, London in December 2006, and will probably be published in a...

    Show More
  • Decreased conscious level: consider CO poisoning
    Christopher Downing

    Dear Editor,

    Richard Bowker and the Paediatric Accident and Emergency Research Group are to be congratulated on their excellent guideline [1]. It appears comprehensive enough to detect all possible diagnoses while being concise enough to be workable. It does appear vulnerable in the area of poisoning, however.

    Carbon monoxide remains the most common cause of fatal poisoning in the UK [2], and should be...

    Show More

Pages