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Implementing less invasive surfactant administration on a neonatal unit
  1. Sarah Louise Williamson,
  2. Helen McDermott,
  3. Harsha Gowda
  1. Neonatal Unit, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sarah Louise Williamson, Neonatal Unit, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham B15 2TG, UK; sarahlouise.williamson{at}nhs.net

Abstract

There is increasing evidence reflected in both UK 2019 NICE and European guidelines suggesting that less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) reduces the need for mechanical ventilation and reduces the combined outcome of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and is now the optimal method for surfactant delivery in spontaneously breathing babies. Despite this, uptake in England has been slow compared with Europe. This quality improvement project outlines the process of implementing LISA in a neonatal intensive care unit over a 2-year period, the barriers and challenges which were encountered, and how they were overcome.

  • neonatology
  • data collection

Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as online supplemental information. All relevant data are included in the study. Any further requests should be directed to the authors.

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Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as online supplemental information. All relevant data are included in the study. Any further requests should be directed to the authors.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors have equally contributed to the design and implementation of the quality improvement project and co-written the report.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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