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Implementation of a health surveillance clinic for children with Down syndrome
  1. Niamh C Lagan1,2,
  2. Fiona Mc Grane1,2,
  3. Dean Huggard2,
  4. Jennifer Sharkey3,
  5. Claire Purcell4,
  6. Joanne Balfe1,2,
  7. Eleanor Molloy2,4
  1. 1Department of Neurodisability and Developmental Paediatrics, Children's Health Ireland at Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland
  2. 2Paediatrics, Academic Centre, Tallaght University Hospital, University of Dublin Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
  3. 3Audiology, Tallaght University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  4. 4Paediatrics, Children's Health Ireland at Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland
  1. Correspondence to Professor Eleanor Molloy, Paediatrics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 24, Ireland; eleanor.molloy{at}tcd.ie

Abstract

The implementation of the multidisciplinary Down Syndrome Health Surveillance clinic at Children’s Health Ireland at Tallaght, Dublin has shown significant improvements in the adherence to guidelines as well as providing health promotion strategies such as information on immunisations. Our project provides a framework which would be potentially emulated and used in other medical conditions. The reduction in clinic attendances and co-ordination of same-day appointments has improved parental satisfaction as well as the quality of care.

  • down syndrome
  • quality improvement
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Footnotes

  • Contributors NCL wrote the first draft of the manuscript. Each author listed on the manuscript has seen and approved the submission of this version of the manuscript and takes full responsibility for the manuscript and its analyses and interpretation.

  • Funding This study was funded by National Children’s Hospital Fund, Tallaght and National Children’s Research Centre, Crumlin, Dublin.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as online supplementary information. The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author (NCL) on reasonable request.

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