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Fifteen-minute consultation: Breastfeeding in the first 2 weeks of life—a hospital perspective
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  • Published on:
    Knowledge-Attitude-Practice gap in Breastfeeding Practices
    • Jogender Kumar, Neonatologist Post Graduate Institute of Medical education and Research, Chandigarh India 160012
    • Other Contributors:
      • Arushi Yadav, Doctor

    Dear Editor,
    We read with interest the article by Levene et al on the importance of breastfeeding and ways to improve it. [1] This article meticulously narrates the common barriers and possible solutions for them. It reminds me a famous quote by Keith Hansen “If breastfeeding did not already exist, someone who invented it today would deserve a dual Nobel Prize in medicine and economics”. [2] The Lancet breastfeeding series [3] meticulously calculated the individual as well as global physical, social and economic benefits of the breastfeeding. Despite knowledge about the benefits of the breastfeeding, there is a wide gap in attitude and practice of it. It is one of the paradoxes positive health practice which is more common among the low-income countries than the richer ones. For example, in countries like Rwanda and Sri Lanka, the exclusive breastfeeding rates are as high as 85% and 76% respectively. [3] So, there is something beyond the knowledge alone, i.e. attitude towards breastfeeding which is not stressed much. To bridge this KAP gap for this novel cost-effective investment, we need to work on improving the attitude of mothers as well as healthcare professionals towards breastfeeding. A practical solution will be to do quality improvement studies using PDSA cycles at small scales and identify the barriers at that particular setup. It might be possible that the barriers across the countries are significantly different, in that case, “one model fits all” strateg...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.