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Sustained inflation breaths at birth were not beneficial for extremely preterm infants
  1. Abdul Razak1,2,
  2. Ibrahim A Hamama3
  1. 1 Pediatrics, Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University, King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Al Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  2. 2 Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  3. 3 Pediatrics, King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Al Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  1. Correspondence to Dr. Abdul Razak, Pediatrics, Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University, King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Al Riyadh, Saudi Arabia ; razakmdpaed{at}gmail.com

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Study question

Does sustained inflation compared with standard intermittent positive pressure ventilation for resuscitating extremely preterm infants at birth reduces the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age?1

Design: Randomised clinical trial in 18 neonatal intensive care units of nine countries.

Patients

Inclusion criteria: Preterm infants between 23 weeks 0 days’ and 26 weeks 6 days’ gestational age who required positive pressure ventilation at birth because of ineffective respiratory effort or a heart rate <100 beats/min.

Exclusion criteria: Non-viable infants and infants with major anomalies.

Interventions: Sustained inflation: two sustained inflations each lasting for 15 s provided by either a face mask or a nasopharyngeal airway. The first inflation peak pressure was 20 cm H2O, and the second inflation peak pressure was 25 cm H2O.

Comparison: Standard resuscitation: intermittent positive pressure ventilation and positive end-expiatory pressure as per neonatal resuscitation programme guidelines.

Outcomes: Primary outcome: composite of death or survival …

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Footnotes

  • AR and IAH contributed equally.

  • Contributors AR and IAH appraised the journal article critically, drafted the manuscript and approved the final version. AR and IAH are Joint first authors.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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