Responses

PDF

Fifteen-minute consultation: Medically unexplained symptoms
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Re: 'medically unexplained symptom' means that the doctor has a problem

    Dr Kraemer is correct in pointing out that the presence of a child mental health team integrated into the paediatric team in the hospital is, where resources allow, often the best way to manage children and young people with medically unexplained symptoms, and indeed with a range of other physical and psychological presentations. See also Cottrell, 2015, http://adc.bmj.com/content/100/4/308

    Conflict of Interest:...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    'medically unexplained symptom' means that the doctor has a problem
    • S KRAEMER, retired consultant paediatric liaison psychiatrist

    Professor Cottrell's guidance for paediatricians confronted with patients whose symptoms cannot be explained minimises the real problem that arises when a mental health opinion may be required. He says "the use if words like 'psychological' is unhelpful and is associated with making things up" which is indeed the case. A very useful study by Furness et al (2009) interviewed hospital paediatricians and child health nurses...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.