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Fifteen-minute consultation: A child with toe walking
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  • Published on:
    Re: Toe walking in infancy
    • Arnab Seal, Dr
    • Other Contributors:
      • Shobha Sivaramakrishnan

    We agree that baby walkers and door suspenders can be associated with transient toe walking and delayed walking, which usually would correct spontaneously relatively quickly once the children stop using the device. The use of such devices should be strongly discouraged as part of normal parenting practice. Enquiry regarding inappropriate use of either of these devices in a toddler who has tip toe gait on independent or sup...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Toe walking in infancy
    I read with interest Sivaramakrishnan et al's structured approach to a child with toe walking [1]. Various levels of contexts such as parenting, maternal education, poverty and social networks interact with each other and with genetic expression to create long-lasting consequences for development [2,3]. Sometimes, single or isolated negative environmental factors may make a major contribution to developmental problems with most n...
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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.