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Autism: the management and support of children and young people on the autism spectrum (NICE Clinical Guideline 170)
  1. Belinda H A Crowe1,
  2. Alison T Salt1,2
  1. 1The Wolfson Neurodisability Service, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Alison Salt, The Wolfson Neurodisability Service, Level 10, Old Nurses Home Building, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Great Ormond Street, London WC1N 3JH, UK; Alison.Salt{at}gosh.nhs.uk

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Information about the current guideline

In August 2013 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) collaborated with the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) to publish a guideline entitled ‘Autism: the management and support of children and young people on the autism spectrum’. It aims to summarise the different ways professionals can provide support, treatment and help for children and young people with autism across the full range of intellectual abilities, from birth until their 19th birthday.1 NICE commissioned the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health to develop this guideline. A multidisciplinary Guideline Development Group comprising healthcare professionals, patients and carers reviewed the evidence and developed recommendations (box 1).

Box 1 Resources

NICE guidance and full guideline:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG170

Information for the public:

http://publications.nice.org.uk/managing-autism-in-children-and-young-people-ifp170

NICE Autism Pathway:

http://pathways.nice.org.uk/pathways/autism

The National Autistic Society—the leading UK charity for people with autism and their families:

http://www.autism.org.uk/

Contact A Family—a charity providing peer support for families of disabled children:

http://www.cafamily.org.uk/

Previous guidelines

This is the first national guideline to focus on the management and support of children and young people on the autism spectrum. It should be read in conjunction with ‘Autism: recognition, referral and diagnosis of children and young people on the autism spectrum’ (NICE clinical guideline 128) published in September 2011 and ‘Autism: recognition, referral, diagnosis and management of adults on the autism spectrum’ (NICE clinical guideline 142) published in June 2012.2 ,3

Key issues addressed by the guideline

  • Access to health and social care services

    • All children and young people with autism should have full access to services, including mental health services, regardless of intellectual ability or coexisting diagnosis.

  • Knowledge and competence of health and social care professionals

    • All professionals working with children and young people with autism should receive training in autism awareness and management, to include behaviour that challenges, risk assessment and communication.

  • Adjusting the social and physical environment and …

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