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A congenital purplish tumour
  1. L Matarazzo1,
  2. A Delise1,
  3. F Zennaro2,
  4. R Bussani1,3,
  5. S Demarini2,
  6. I Berti2,
  7. A Ventura1,2
  1. 1University of Trieste, Italy
  2. 2Institute for Maternal and Child Health—IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo", Trieste, Italy
  3. 3Institute of Pathology, Cattinara Hospital, Trieste, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Dr L Matarazzo, University of Trieste, Via dell'Istria 65/1, Trieste 34137, Italy; lorenza.matarazzo{at}gmail.com

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An ethnic Bengali baby boy presented at birth with a purplish tender lesion on the medial side of his right knee (figure 1A). In the following weeks, the lesion remained stable in size. An ultrasound scan showed a solid mass, slightly heterogeneous, with a vascular pole but no bone involvement (figure 1B).

Figure 1

(A) Clinical presentation at diagnosis. (B) An ultrasound shows a solid, moderately vascularised and slightly heterogeneous mass, with a vascular pole but no bone involvement.

Question 1

What is your diagnosis?

  1. Congenital haemangioma

  2. Vascular malformations

  3. Infantile myofibroma

  4. Malignant tumours

  5. Tufted angioma

Answer 1

The correct answer is E. Tufted angioma (TA) represents a benign vascular tumour that may be congenital, acquired, sporadic or hereditary.1 It usually occurs during infancy or early childhood on the neck, trunk or upper extremities.2 It appears as a dusky red, violaceous solitary tumour or infiltrating plaque, sometimes …

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