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Neonatal seizures—part 1: Not everything that jerks, stiffens and shakes is a fit
  1. Anthony R Hart1,2,
  2. Elizabeth L Pilling2,
  3. James JP Alix3
  1. 1Department of Paediatric and Neonatal Neurology, Sheffield Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ryegate Children's Centre, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK
  2. 2Department of Neonatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK
  3. 3Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Anthony Hart, Department of Paediatric and Neonatal Neurology, Sheffield Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ryegate Children's Centre, Tapton Crescent Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, S10 5DD, UK; anthony.hart{at}sch.nhs.uk

Abstract

The neonatal period is the most frequent time of life to have epileptic seizures. However, neonates can also exhibit unusual movements that are not epileptic seizures. Differentiating between epileptic and non-epileptic movements can be difficult. Many neonatal seizures exhibit few or no clinical features at all. This article is for the benefit of paediatric trainees and reviews the published evidence on which neonatal movements are likely to be epileptic seizures and which are not. We also discuss epileptic seizure classification.

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