Article Text

other Versions

PDF
An interesting case of ptosis in an infant
  1. Helen Elizabeth Groves1,
  2. Sharon Christie2,
  3. Gerry McGinnity3,
  4. Donncha Hanrahan4,
  5. Andrew Thompson5
  1. 1Department of Paediatrics, Royal Belfast Hospital For Sick Children, Belfast, UK
  2. 2Paediatric Infectious Disease Department, Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Belfast, UK
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK
  4. 4Department of Paediatric Neurology, Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Belfast, UK
  5. 5Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Belfast, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Helen Elizabeth Groves, Department of Paediatrics, Royal Belfast Hospital For Sick Children, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK; hgroves01{at}qub.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

A 6-week-old infant presented to accident and emergency with apnoeic episodes. On arrival, the infant was pale and floppy, requiring fluid resuscitation and intubation prior to transfer to the paediatric intensive care unit. Broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics were commenced and the infant made a good recovery, being extubated after 48 h. Lumbar puncture was unsuccessful; however, blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

By day 4, the infant's left eye was noted to be closed over and ophthalmological assessment revealed a complete ptosis (figure 1). The pupil was dilated and unreactive to light. The resting position of the left eye was downward and outward with limited ocular movements in the superior and medial directions.

Figure 1

Complete ptosis of left eye.

Questions

  1. Which cranial nerve is affected?

  2. What causes of this condition should be …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.