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Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed 98:92 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2013-303842
  • Epilogue

Questions on adolescent articles

  1. Robert Scott-Jupp
  • Received 9 February 2013
  • Accepted 27 February 2013

Welcome to the first of this new feature. Epilogue will appear regularly in Education and Practice and is intended to serve as means by which practising paediatricians can assess their own knowledge and skills. Some articles, as this one, will be based on articles already published in the journal. Others will be based on clinical cases, images or current practice guidelines.

By successfully answering the questions, readers will be able to demonstrate to their own satisfaction that they have fully grasped the article, and thereby contribute to their own continuing professional development.

Annotated answers will always be available in the same edition.

The questions below are based on two articles which appeared in the June 2012 edition of Education and Practice:

Gleeson H, Turner G. Transition to adult services. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed 2012;97:86–92. http://ep.bmj.com/content/97/3/86.full

White B, Viner RM. Improving communication with adolescents. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed 2012;97:93–7. http://ep.bmj.com/content/97/3/93.full

Answers to the following quiz questions can be found on page 119

Questions

1. Name three of the key UK government documents relating to transition of young people (YP) with chronic illnesses from paediatric to adult services, published since 2003.

2. List five of the elements specified in the literature that have been identified by YP as most important in their relationship with their doctors.

3. Identify the three ‘levels of need’ of chronic conditions that affect the nature of transition.

4. List four methods of easing transition to adult care, which have been shown by the evidence to be effective.

5. List four of the most important things to do in the first 2 minutes of any consultation with an adolescent.

6. Which of the following three statements is most appropriate when discussing confidentiality with a young person, in UK practice?

(a)  ‘This conversation is private between you and me. This means I won't tell your parents what we talk about unless you want me to. However, if you tell me something that worries me, like if you are being abused or you want to seriously harm yourself, then I may need to share this with other professional people such as a social worker. I will tell you if I need to do this’.

(b)  ‘This conversation is private between you and me. You have a legal right to confidentiality. If you tell me something that could suggest to me that you might be at risk, like if you are being abused or you are wanting to seriously harm yourself, then I would suggest strongly that you talk to your parents, a friend or a teacher about it, but I will not break your confidence’.

(c)  ‘This conversation is private between you and me. However, as you are still legally a child, if you tell me something that worries me, like if you are being abused or you are wanting to seriously harm yourself, then I will have to involve your parents as well as sharing what you tell me with other professional people such as a social worker’.

7. What is the purpose of the acronym HEADSS and what does it stand for?